Job seekers sometimes ask how IBM defines “data scientist.” It’s an important question since more and more would-be data scientists are fighting for attention in an increasingly lucrative labor market.
IOTA, the eighth largest blockchain in the world and one built specifically to power the internet-of-things economy, launched a data marketplace today, in partnership with over 20 large organizations around the world, including Microsoft, Bosch, Samsung, and Fujitsu.
Above: Deepak Agarwal, LinkedIn's head of artificial intelligence, speaks at VB Summit 2017 in Berkeley, California on October 24, 2017.
Above: A screenshot shows a map of terrorism coverage in English and Russia, compiled by Primer's technology.
Above: Garrett Tenold, a senior director for product management at Amplero, discusses the company's product at VB Summit 2017 in Berkeley, California on October 24, 2017.
We are in a race for quantum supremacy. Google, IBM, and researchers across the globe are working on solving the most complex of computations, computations that could only be solved by the most advanced quantum computers.
At Chrome Dev Summit 2017 today in San Francisco, Google announced two new tools related to its browser: the Chrome User Experience Report and Trusted Web Activity. The former is meant to help developers improve their site’s user experience, and the latter is a new way to combine Android apps and the web in one experience.
Georgia State University (GSU) has received a $300,000 Digital Economy Initiative grant from the Silicon Valley Community Foundation, the largest community foundation in the world, in collaboration with Cisco Corporate Social Responsibility, to propel students, especially those underrepresented in the tech scene, to pursue a technology career.
The most interesting Google Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL feature, to me, is Now Playing. If you’ve ever used Shazam or SoundHound, you probably understand the basics: The app uses your device’s microphone to capture an audio sample and creates an acoustic fingerprint to compare against a central song database. If a match is found, information such as the song title and artist are sent back to the user.
Above: A picture illustration shows a YouTube logo reflected in a person's eye. Four months after launching a program to fight violent extremist content, YouTube says it has become far more efficient at identifying and removing such videos, thanks to its machine learning technology.

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