Above: A tense moment in the sitting room.2017 is wrapping up and so reflect we must on the year that was. By now you’ve hopefully seen our extensive list of nominees for our Best of 2017 awards, which we think do a pretty great job of representing the VR industry in 2017. But, as with any medium, there are a handful of apps that flew under the radar this year that we really, really don’t think you should be missing out on.
Above: Rusel Demaria's Game of X chronicles the history of the Xbox.Rusel Demaria is interested in the history of games, and he doesn’t want it to slip away from us.
Above: Palmer Luckey, creator of the Oculus Rift.Here’s how hectic the world of virtual reality has been in 2017: while writing up this list of the biggest stories to break this year, I could have sworn Palmer Luckey had parted ways with Oculus more than 12 months ago. There’s been so much to keep up with that even some of the year’s industry-shaking stories managed to slip through the cracks.
I loved Uncharted: The Lost Legacy. I’m just not sure what to call it.Naughty Dog planned for the this PlayStation 4 adventure to be downloadable content for 2016’s Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End. But the project’s scale grew, and The Lost Legacy turned into a standalone experience. It’s kind of a sequel, kind of a continuation of Uncharted 4. It’s hard to categorize.
Above: Moss.And that’s a wrap on 2017. We’ve played some amazing games in VR this year but, as always, we’re wondering what’s next. It’s a bit of a tradition here now to round up all the big releases we’re looking forward to in the coming year, so that’s exactly what we’ve done. This year’s list is the biggest one yet, and that’s without including scores of promising titles already in Early Access. With VR headsets now cheaper than they’ve ever been before, 2018 is shaping up to be a great year to jump in on the fun.
Drop Software Inc. wants to change the way people access information in virtual reality. Its flagship VR title, Drop, provides a 360-degree environment that folks can use to browse the internet. It raised a seed round of an undisclosed amount in August, drawing investments from HTC as well as firms such as Macro Ventures, Autochrome Ventures, and Backstage Capital. Drop is available on the HTC Vive headset.
Countless tech startups break out in a given year. The majority fail. Of the ones that don’t, some are boring, some are copycats, and some are worth mentioning, but not necessarily highlighting. Just one startup stood out to me in 2017: Eve-Tech.
Above: A Skirmisher, a Reaper, and a squaddie face off against the zombie-like Lost.2017 was a strange, though good, year for strategy games. After the sensational 2016, with five major releases and some fascinating indie games, this was always likely to be a consolidation year. So while we didn’t see too much new and exciting to blow strategy players away, we did get a bunch of improvements and enhancements to existing games in the form of sequels, expansions, and mods. Good? Sure, but perhaps not the explosion of amazement that gaming at large had in 2017.
I’ve been pretty religious about playing Call of Duty multiplayer every year. But with Call of Duty: WWII, I managed to hit the highest level of 55 in the game yesterday. That is the earliest I’ve hit Prestige, as the top level is known, that I can remember.
Above: Teddy Dief and Ethan Redd, two-thirds of The World Trees at the Drawfee Game Jam.Drawfee is normally a zany art channel on YouTube, but earlier this month, it hosted a two-day game jam sponsored by the anime hosting site Crunchyroll. Developers such as Teddy Dief (Hyper Light Drifter), Jo Fu (Ghosts of Miami), and Ethan Redd (Blazing Legion: Ignition) participated in the event, and you can download all five PC games for free on its page today.

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